security update
[ikiwiki.git] / doc / security.mdwn
1 Let's do an ikiwiki security analysis..
2
3 If you are using ikiwiki to render pages that only you can edit, do not
4 generate any wrappers, and do not use the cgi, then there are no more
5 security issues with this program than with cat(1). If, however, you let
6 others edit pages in your wiki, then some possible security issues do need
7 to be kept in mind.
8
9 ----
10
11 # Probable holes
12
13 ## svn commit logs
14
15 Anyone with svn commit access can forge "web commit from foo" and make it
16 appear on [[RecentChanges]] like foo committed. One way to avoid this would
17 be to limit web commits to those done by a certian user.
18
19 It's actually possible to force a whole series of svn commits to appear to
20 have come just before yours, by forging svn log output. This could be
21 guarded against by using svn log --xml.
22
23 ikiwiki escapes any html in svn commit logs to prevent other mischief.
24
25 ----
26
27 # Potential gotchas
28
29 _(Things not to do.)_
30
31 ## image file etc attacks
32
33 If it enounters a file type it does not understand, ikiwiki just copies it
34 into place. So if you let users add any kind of file they like, they can
35 upload images, movies, windows executables, css files, etc (though not html
36 files). If these files exploit security holes in the browser of someone
37 who's viewing the wiki, that can be a security problem.
38
39 Of course nobody else seems to worry about this in other wikis, so should we?
40
41 Currently only people with direct svn commit access can upload such files
42 (and if you wanted to you could block that with a svn pre-commit hook).
43 Wsers with only web commit access are limited to editing pages as ikiwiki
44 doesn't support file uploads from browsers (yet), so they can't exploit
45 this.
46
47 ## multiple accessors of wiki directory
48
49 If multiple people can write to the source directory ikiwiki is using, or
50 to the destination directory it writes files to, then one can cause trouble
51 for the other when they run ikiwiki through symlink attacks.
52
53 So it's best if only one person can ever write to those directories.
54
55 ## setup files
56
57 Setup files are not safe to keep in subversion with the rest of the wiki.
58 Just don't do it. [[ikiwiki.setup]] is *not* used as the setup file for
59 this wiki, BTW.
60
61 ## page locking can be bypassed via direct svn commits
62
63 A [[lock]]ed page can only be edited on the web by an admin, but
64 anyone who is allowed to commit direct to svn can bypass this. This is by
65 design, although a subversion pre-commit hook could be used to prevent
66 editing of locked pages when using subversion, if you really need to.
67
68 ## web server attacks
69
70 If your web server does any parsing of special sorts of files (for example,
71 server parsed html files), then if you let anyone else add files to the wiki,
72 they can try to use this to exploit your web server.
73
74 ----
75
76 # Hopefully non-holes
77
78 _(AKA, the assumptions that will be the root of most security holes...)_
79
80 ## exploting ikiwiki with bad content
81
82 Someone could add bad content to the wiki and hope to exploit ikiwiki.
83 Note that ikiwiki runs with perl taint checks on, so this is unlikely.
84
85 ## publishing cgi scripts
86
87 ikiwiki does not allow cgi scripts to be published as part of the wiki. Or
88 rather, the script is published, but it's not marked executable (except in
89 the case of "destination directory file replacement" below), so hopefully
90 your web server will not run it.
91
92 ## suid wrappers
93
94 ikiwiki --wrapper is intended to generate a wrapper program that
95 runs ikiwiki to update a given wiki. The wrapper can in turn be made suid,
96 for example to be used in a [[post-commit]] hook by people who cannot write
97 to the html pages, etc.
98
99 If the wrapper script is made suid, then any bugs in this wrapper would be
100 security holes. The wrapper is written as securely as I know how, is based
101 on code that has a history of security use long before ikiwiki, and there's
102 been no problem yet.
103
104 ## shell exploits
105
106 ikiwiki does not expose untrusted data to the shell. In fact it doesn't use
107 system() at all, and the only use of backticks is on data supplied by the
108 wiki admin and untainted filenames. And it runs with taint checks on of
109 course..
110
111 ## cgi data security
112
113 When ikiwiki runs as a cgi to edit a page, it is passed the name of the
114 page to edit. It has to make sure to sanitise this page, to prevent eg,
115 editing of ../../../foo, or editing of files that are not part of the wiki,
116 such as subversion dotfiles. This is done by sanitising the filename
117 removing unallowed characters, then making sure it doesn't start with "/"
118 or contain ".." or "/.svn/". Annoyingly ad-hoc, this kind of code is where
119 security holes breed. It needs a test suite at the very least.
120
121 ## CGI::Session security
122
123 I've audited this module and it is massively insecure by default. ikiwiki
124 uses it in one of the few secure ways; by forcing it to write to a
125 directory it controls (and not /tmp) and by setting a umask that makes the
126 file not be world readable.
127
128 ## cgi password security
129
130 Login to the wiki involves sending a password in cleartext over the net.
131 Cracking the password only allows editing the wiki as that user though.
132 If you care, you can use https, I suppose.
133
134 ## XSS holes in CGI output
135
136 ikiwiki has not yet been audited to ensure that all cgi script input/output
137 is sanitised to prevent XSS attacks. For example, a user can't register
138 with a username containing html code (anymore).
139
140 It's difficult to know for sure if all such avenues have really been
141 closed though.
142
143 ----
144
145 # Fixed holes
146
147 _(Unless otherwise noted, these were discovered and immediatey fixed by the
148 ikiwiki developers.)_
149
150 ## destination directory file replacement
151
152 Any file in the destination directory that is a valid page filename can be
153 replaced, even if it was not originally rendered from a page. For example,
154 ikiwiki.cgi could be edited in the wiki, and it would write out a
155 replacement. File permission is preseved. Yipes!
156
157 This was fixed by making ikiwiki check if the file it's writing to exists;
158 if it does then it has to be a file that it's aware of creating before, or
159 it will refuse to create it.
160
161 Still, this sort of attack is something to keep in mind.
162
163 ## symlink attacks
164
165 Could a committer trick ikiwiki into following a symlink and operating on
166 some other tree that it shouldn't? svn supports symlinks, so one can get
167 into the repo. ikiwiki uses File::Find to traverse the repo, and does not
168 tell it to follow symlinks, but it might be possible to race replacing a
169 directory with a symlink and trick it into following the link.
170
171 Also, if someone checks in a symlink to /etc/passwd, ikiwiki would read and
172 publish that, which could be used to expose files a committer otherwise
173 wouldn't see.
174
175 To avoid this, ikiwiki will skip over symlinks when scanning for pages, and
176 uses locking to prevent more than one instance running at a time. The lock
177 prevents one ikiwiki from running a svn up at the wrong time to race
178 another ikiwiki. So only attackers who can write to the working copy on
179 their own can race it.
180
181 ## symlink + cgi attacks
182
183 Similarly, a svn commit of a symlink could be made, ikiwiki ignores it
184 because of the above, but the symlink is still there, and then you edit the
185 page from the web, which follows the symlink when reading the page, and
186 again when saving the changed page.
187
188 This was fixed by making ikiwiki refuse to read or write to files that are
189 symlinks, or that are in subdirectories that are symlinks, combined with
190 the above locking.
191
192 ## underlaydir override attacks
193
194 ikiwiki also scans an underlaydir for pages, this is used to provide stock
195 pages to all wikis w/o needing to copy them into the wiki. Since ikiwiki
196 internally stores only the base filename from the underlaydir or srcdir,
197 and searches for a file in either directory when reading a page source,
198 there is the potential for ikiwiki's scanner to reject a file from the
199 srcdir for some reason (such as it being a symlink), find a valid copy of
200 the file in the underlaydir, and then when loading the file, mistekenly
201 load the bad file from the srcdir.
202
203 This attack is avoided by making ikiwiki scan the srcdir first, and refuse
204 to add any files from the underlaydir if a file also exists in the srcdir
205 with the same name. **But**, note that this assumes that any given page can
206 be produced from a file with only one name (`page.mdwn` => `page.html`).
207
208 If it's possible for files with different names to produce a given page, it
209 would still be possible to use this attack to confuse ikiwiki into
210 rendering the wrong thing. This is not currently possible, but must be kept
211 in mind in the future when for example adding support for generating html
212 pages from source with some other extension.
213
214 ## XSS attacks in page content
215
216 ikiwiki supports [[HtmlSanitization]], though it can be turned off.