web commit by joey
[ikiwiki.git] / doc / about_rcs_backends.mdwn
1 ## A few bits about the RCS backends
2
3 ### Terminology
4
5 ``web-edit'' means that a page is edited by using the web (CGI) interface
6 as opposed to using a editor and the RCS interface.
7
8
9 ### [[Subversion]]
10
11 Subversion was the first RCS to be supported by ikiwiki.
12
13 #### How does it work internally?
14
15 Master repository M.
16
17 RCS commits from the outside are installed into M.
18
19 There is a working copy of M (a checkout of M): W.
20
21 HTML is generated from W.  rcs_update() will update from M to W.
22
23 CGI operates on W.  rcs_commit() will commit from W to M.
24
25 You browse and web-edit the wiki on W.
26
27
28 ### [darcs](http://darcs.net/) (not yet included)
29
30 Support for using darcs as a backend is being worked on by [Thomas
31 Schwinge](mailto:tschwinge@gnu.org).
32
33 #### How will it work internally?
34
35 ``Master'' repository R1.
36
37 RCS commits from the outside are installed into R1.
38
39 HTML is generated from R1.  HTML is automatically generated (by using a
40 ``post-hook'') each time a new change is installed into R1.  It follows
41 that rcs_update() is not needed.
42
43 There is a working copy of R1: R2.
44
45 CGI operates on R2.  rcs_commit() will push from R2 to R1.
46
47 You browse the wiki on R1 and web-edit it on R2.  This means for example
48 that R2 needs to be updated from R1 if you are going the web-edit a page,
49 as the user otherwise might be irritated otherwise...
50
51 How do changes get from R1 to R2?  Currently only internally in
52 rcs_commit().  Is rcs_prepedit() suitable?
53
54 It follows that the HTML rendering and the CGI handling can be completely
55 separated parts in ikiwiki.
56
57 What repository should [[RecentChanges]] and [[History]] work on?  R1?
58
59 ##### Rationale for doing it differently than in the Subversion case
60
61 darcs is a distributed RCS, which means that every checkout of a
62 repository is equal to the repository it was checked-out from.  There is
63 no forced hierarchy.
64
65 R1 is the nevertheless called the master repository.  It's used for
66 collecting all the changes and publishing them: on the one hand via the
67 rendered HTML and on the other via the standard darcs RCS interface.
68
69 R2, the repository where CGI operates on, is just a checkout of R1 and
70 doesn't really differ from the other checkouts that people will branch
71 off from R1.
72
73 (To be continued.)