reorg all the pages about rcs backends. Fix all links
[ikiwiki.git] / doc / rcs / details.mdwn
1 A few bits about the RCS backends
2
3 [[toc ]]
4
5 ## Terminology
6
7 ``web-edit'' means that a page is edited by using the web (CGI) interface
8 as opposed to using a editor and the RCS interface.
9
10
11 ## [[svn]]
12
13 Subversion was the first RCS to be supported by ikiwiki.
14
15 ### How does it work internally?
16
17 Master repository M.
18
19 RCS commits from the outside are installed into M.
20
21 There is a working copy of M (a checkout of M): W.
22
23 HTML is generated from W.  rcs_update() will update from M to W.
24
25 CGI operates on W.  rcs_commit() will commit from W to M.
26
27 For all the gory details of how ikiwiki handles this behind the scenes,
28 see [[commit-internals]].
29
30 You browse and web-edit the wiki on W.
31
32 W "belongs" to ikiwiki and should not be edited directly.
33
34
35 ## [darcs](http://darcs.net/) (not yet included)
36
37 Support for using darcs as a backend is being worked on by [Thomas
38 Schwinge](mailto:tschwinge@gnu.org), although development is on hold curretly.
39 There is a patch in [[todo/darcs]].
40
41 ### How will it work internally?
42
43 ``Master'' repository R1.
44
45 RCS commits from the outside are installed into R1.
46
47 HTML is generated from R1.  HTML is automatically generated (by using a
48 ``post-hook'') each time a new change is installed into R1.  It follows
49 that rcs_update() is not needed.
50
51 There is a working copy of R1: R2.
52
53 CGI operates on R2.  rcs_commit() will push from R2 to R1.
54
55 You browse the wiki on R1 and web-edit it on R2.  This means for example
56 that R2 needs to be updated from R1 if you are going to web-edit a page,
57 as the user otherwise might be irritated otherwise...
58
59 How do changes get from R1 to R2?  Currently only internally in
60 rcs\_commit().  Is rcs\_prepedit() suitable?
61
62 It follows that the HTML rendering and the CGI handling can be completely
63 separated parts in ikiwiki.
64
65 What repository should [[RecentChanges]] and [[History]] work on?  R1?
66
67 #### Rationale for doing it differently than in the Subversion case
68
69 darcs is a distributed RCS, which means that every checkout of a
70 repository is equal to the repository it was checked-out from.  There is
71 no forced hierarchy.
72
73 R1 is nevertheless called the master repository.  It's used for
74 collecting all the changes and publishing them: on the one hand via the
75 rendered HTML and on the other via the standard darcs RCS interface.
76
77 R2, the repository the CGI operates on, is just a checkout of R1 and
78 doesn't really differ from the other checkouts that people will branch
79 off from R1.
80
81 (To be continued.)
82
83 #### Another possible approach
84
85 Here's what I (tuomov) think, would be a “cleaner” approach:
86
87  1. Upon starting to edit, Ikiwiki gets a copy of the page, and `darcs changes --context`.
88      This context _and_ the present version of the page are stored in as the “version” of the
89      page in a hidden control of the HTML.
90      Thus the HTML includes all that is needed to generate a patch wrt. to the state of the
91      repository at the time the edit was started. This is of course all that darcs needs.
92  2. Once the user is done with editing, _Ikiwiki generates a patch bundle_ for darcs.
93      This should be easy with existing `Text::Diff` or somesuch modules, as the Web edits
94      only concern single files. The reason why the old version of the page is stored in
95      the HTML (possibly compressed) is that the diff can be generated.
96  3. Now this patch bundle is applied with `darcs apply`, or sent by email for moderation…
97      there are many possibilities.
98
99 This approach avoids some of the problems of concurrent edits that the previous one may have,
100 although there may be conflicts, which may or may not propagate to the displayed web page.
101 (Unfortunately there is not an option to `darcs apply` to generate some sort of ‘confliction resolution
102 bundle’.) Also, only one repository is needed, as it is never directly modified
103 by Ikiwiki. 
104
105 This approach might be applicable to other distributed VCSs as well, although they're not as oriented
106 towards transmitting changes with standalone patch bundles (often by email) as darcs is.
107
108 > The mercurial plugin seems to just use one repo and edit it directly - is
109 > there some reason that's okay there but not for darcs? I agree with tuomov
110 > that having just the one repo would be preferable; the point of a dvcs is
111 > that there's no difference between one repo and another. I've got a
112 > darcs.pm based on mercurial.pm, that's almost usable... --bma
113
114 >> IMHO it comes down to whatever works well for a given RCS. Seems like
115 >> the darcs approach _could_ be done with most any distributed system, but
116 >> it might be overkill for some (or all?) While there is the incomplete darcs
117 >> plugin in [[todo/darcs]], if you submit one that's complete, I will
118 >> probably accept it into ikiwiki.. --[[Joey]]
119
120 ## [[Git]]
121
122 Regarding the Git support, Recai says:
123
124 I have been testing it for the past few days and it seems satisfactory.  I
125 haven't observed any race condition regarding the concurrent blog commits
126 and it handles merge conflicts gracefully as far as I can see.
127
128 As you may notice from the patch size, GIT support is not so trivial to
129 implement (for me, at least).  Being a fairly fresh code base it has some
130 bugs.  It also has some drawbacks (especially wrt merge which was the hard
131 part).  GIT doesn't have a similar functionality like 'svn merge -rOLD:NEW
132 FILE' (please see the relevant comment in mergepast for more details), so I
133 had to invent an ugly hack just for the purpose.
134
135 By design, Git backend uses a "master-clone" repository pair approach in contrast
136 to the single repository approach (here, _clone_ may be considered as the working
137 copy of a fictious web user).  Even though a single repository implementation is
138 possible, it somewhat increases the code complexity of backend (I couldn't figure
139 out a uniform method which doesn't depend on the prefered repository model, yet).
140 By exploiting the fact that the master repo and _web user_'s repo (`srcdir`) are all
141 on the same local machine, I suggest to create the latter with the "`git clone -l -s`"
142 command to save disk space.
143
144 Note that, as a rule of thumb, you should always put the rcs wrapper (`post-update`)
145 into the master repository (`.git/hooks/`) as can be noticed in the Git wrappers of
146 the sample [[ikiwiki.setup]].
147
148 ## [[Mercurial]]
149
150 The Mercurial backend is still in a early phase, so it may not be mature 
151 enough, but it should be simple to understand and use.
152
153 As Mercurial is a distributed RCS, it lacks the distinction between 
154 repository and working copy (every wc is a repo).
155
156 This means that the Mercurial backend uses directly the repository as 
157 working copy (the master M and the working copy W described in the svn 
158 example are the same thing).
159
160 You only need to specify 'srcdir' (the repository M) and 'destdir' (where
161 the HTML will be generated).
162
163 Master repository M.
164
165 RCS commit from the outside are installed into M.
166
167 M is directly used as working copy (M is also W).
168
169 HTML is generated from the working copy in M. rcs_update() will update 
170 to the last committed revision in M (the same as 'hg update').
171 If you use an 'update' hook you can generate automatically the HTML
172 in the destination directory each time 'hg update' is called.
173
174 CGI operates on M. rcs_commit() will commit directly in M.
175
176 If you have any question or suggestion about the Mercurial backend 
177 please refer to [Emanuele](http://nerd.ocracy.org/em/)
178
179 ## [[tla]]
180
181 ## rcs
182
183 There is a patch that needs a bit of work linked to from [[todo/rcs]].
184
185 ## [[Monotone]]
186
187 In normal use, monotone has a local database as well as a workspace/working copy.
188 In ikiwiki terms, the local database takes the role of the master repository, and
189 the srcdir is the workspace.  As all monotone workspaces point to a default
190 database, there is no need to tell ikiwiki explicitly about the "master" database.  It
191 will know.
192
193 The backend currently supports normal committing and getting the history of the page.
194 To understand the parallel commit approach, you need to understand monotone's
195 approach to conflicts:
196
197 Monotone allows multiple micro-branches in the database.  There is a command,
198 `mtn merge`, that takes the heads of all these branches and merges them back together
199 (turning the tree of branches into a dag).  Conflicts in monotone (at time of writing)
200 need to be resolved interactively during this merge process.
201 It is important to note that having multiple heads is not an error condition in a
202 monotone database.  This condition will occur in normal use.  In this case
203 'update' will choose a head if it can, or complain and tell the user to merge.
204
205 For the ikiwiki plugin, the monotone ikiwiki plugin borrows some ideas from the svn ikiwiki plugin.
206 On prepedit() we record the revision that this change is based on (I'll refer to this as the prepedit revision).  When the web user
207 saves the page, we check if that is still the current revision.  If it is, then we commit.
208 If it isn't then we check to see if there were any changes by anyone else to the file
209 we're editing while we've been editing (a diff bewteen the prepedit revision and the current rev).
210 If there were no changes to the file we're editing then we commit as normal.
211
212 It is only if there have been parallel changes to the file we're trying to commit that
213 things get hairy.  In this case the current approach is to
214 commit the web changes as a branch from the prepedit revision.  This
215 will leave the repository with multiple heads.  At this point, all data is saved.
216 The system then tries to merge the heads with a merger that will fail if it cannot
217 resolve the conflict.  If the merge succeeds then everything is ok.
218
219 If that merge failed then there are conflicts.  In this case, the current code calls
220 merge again with a merger that inserts conflict markers.  It commits this new
221 revision with conflict markers to the repository.  It then returns the text to the
222 user for cleanup.  This is less neat than it could be, in that a conflict marked
223 revision gets committed to the repository.