web commit by XTaran: Correct information about hooks
[ikiwiki.git] / doc / rcs / git.mdwn
1 [[meta title="Git"]]
2
3 [Git][git] is a distributed revison control system originally developed for
4 the Linux kernel. Ikiwiki supports storing a wiki in git.
5
6 [git]: http://git.or.cz/
7
8 Ikiwiki can run as a `post-update` hook to update a wiki whenever commits
9 come in. When running as a [[cgi]] with Git, ikiwiki automatically
10 commits edited pages, and uses the Git history to generate the
11 [[RecentChanges]] page.
12
13 ## git repository setup
14
15 The suggested setup for git is a set of repositories setup like a
16 shallow, single level tree, with a bare repository (meaning that it
17 does not have a working tree checked out) at the root, and various
18 working clones (with working directories) as leaf nodes.  The root
19 (bare) repository is meant to be pushed to and pulled from the various
20 working clones. The image below displays the relationship between the
21 root repository and the clone repositories (this is not a directory
22 layout):
23
24 ![Git repository relationships](http://people.debian.org/~srivasta/ikiwiki_git.png)
25
26 One of the leaf node clone repositories is special; it has working
27 directory which is used to compile the wiki from, and is also used by the
28 [[cgi]] to commit changes made via the web interface. It is special
29 since the `post-commit` hook for the bare root repository is used to
30 trigger an update of this repository, and then an ikiwiki refresh
31 updates the published  wiki itself.
32
33 The other (optional) leaf node repositories are meant for you to work
34 on, and commit to, changes should then be pushed to the bare root
35 repository.  In theory, you could work on the same leaf node repository
36 that ikiwiki uses to compile the wiki from, and the [[cgi]] commits
37 to, as long as you ensure that permissions and ownership don't hinder
38 the working of the [[cgi]]. This can be done, for example, by using
39 ACL's, in practice, it is easier to just setup separate clones for
40 yourself.
41
42 So, to reiterate, when using Git, you probably want to set up three
43 repositories:
44
45 * The root repository. This should be a bare repository (meaning that
46   it does not have a working tree checked out), which the other
47   repositories will push to/pull from.  It is a bare repository, since
48   there are problems pushing to a repository that has a working
49   directory. This is called _repository_ in [[ikiwiki-makerepo]]'s
50   manual page. Nominally, this bare repository has a `post-commit` hook
51   that either is or calls ikiwiki's git wrapper, which changes to the
52   working directory for ikiwiki, does a _git pull_, and refreshes ikiwiki
53   to regenerate the wiki with any new content. The [[setup]] page describes
54   how to do this.
55
56 * The second repository is a clone of the bare root repository, and
57   has a working tree which is used as ikiwiki's srcdir for compiling
58   the wiki. **Never** push to this repository. When running as a
59   [[cgi]], the changes are committed to this repository, and pushed to
60   the master repository above. This is called _srcdir_ in
61   [[ikiwiki-makerepo]]'s manual page.
62
63 * The other (third, fourth, fifth, sixth -- however many pleases you)
64   repositories are also clones of the bare root repository above --
65   and these have a working directory for you to work on. Use either
66   the `git` transport (if available), or `ssh`. These repositories may
67   be on remote machines, your laptop, whereever you find convenient to
68   hack on your wiki. you can commit local changes to the version on
69   the laptop, perhaps while offline. Any new content should be pushed to the
70   bare master repository when you are ready to publish it, and then
71   the post-commit hook of the bare repository will ensure that the
72   ikiwiki's source directory is updated, and the ikiwiki refreshed
73   with the new content.
74
75 Using three or more of repositories isn't the most obvious set up, but
76 it works the best for typical ikiwiki use. [[ikiwiki-makerepo]] can
77 automate setting this up for the common case where there is no
78 pre-existing wiki. [[tips/Laptop_wiki_with_git]] describes a different
79 way to set up ikiwiki and git.
80
81 It is **paramount** that you **never** push to the non-bare repository
82 ([this FAQ entry explains why](http://git.or.cz/gitwiki/GitFaq#head-b96f48bc9c925074be9f95c0fce69bcece5f6e73)).
83 Instead, clone the bare repository as mentioned above, and push
84 **only** to the bare repository.
85
86 The ikiwiki `post-commit` hook should be put in the bare repository.
87
88 ## git repository with multiple committers
89
90 It can be tricky to get the permissions right to allow multiple people to
91 commit to an ikiwiki git repository. As the [[security]] page mentions,
92 for a secure ikiwiki installation, only one person should be able to write
93 to ikiwiki's srcdir. When other committers make commits, their commits
94 should go to the bare repository, which has a `post-update` hook that uses
95 ikiwiki to pull the changes to the srcdir.
96
97 One setup that will work is to put all committers in a group (say,
98 "ikiwiki"), and use permissions to allow that group to commit to the bare git
99 repository. Make both the post-update hook and ikiwiki.cgi be setgid
100 to the group, as well as suid to the user who admins the wiki. The
101 `wrappergroup` [[setup_file_option|usage]] can be used to make the wrappers
102 be setgid to the right group. Then the srcdir, including its git
103 repository, should only be writable by the wiki's admin, and *not* by the
104 group. Take care that ikiwiki uses a umask that does not cause files in
105 the srcdir to become group writable. (umask 022 will work.)
106
107 ## Optionally using a local wiki to preview changes
108
109 When working on the "working clones" to add content to your wiki,
110 it is common (but optional) practice to preview your changes using a
111 private wiki on the local host before publishing the updates by
112 sending it to the root repository. If you do want to setup a private
113 wiki, you will have to have another setup file and and an ikiwiki
114 installation on your local machine. You will need all the packages
115 this implies -- a web server, git, ikiwiki, etc.  However, there is a
116 _caveat_: by default, ikiwiki pulls and pushes from `origin`. This is
117 not ideal for the working clones on the local machine, since you might
118 go through several iterations of a page before pushing to the bare
119 root of the repository tree (and thus publishing it on your public wiki).
120 You do not want the action of refreshing the local wiki in order to
121 review your work to accidentally publish the
122 contents before you are ready. In order to prevent the git push that
123 is the normal behaviour of ikiwiki, set the configuration of the local wiki:
124
125       gitorigin_branch => "",
126       ## git post-commit wrapper
127       wrapper => "/working/dir/.git/hooks/post-commit",
128
129 Then just committing should refresh the private ikiwiki on the local
130 host.  Now just run `ikiwiki -setup localwiki.setup -getctime` and
131 you should be good to go. (You only need the slow `-getctime` option
132 the first time you run setup.)  Use standard git commands to handle
133 pulling from and pushing to the server.  **Note**: Currently, after
134 pulling changes from the bare root repository, you will need to
135 manually update the local wiki, with a command such as `ikiwiki
136 -setup localwiki.setup -refresh`. This is because git 1.5.4 doesn't
137 have a hook that is run locally after pulling changes. Newer
138 versions of git will have a `post-merge` hook that should work for
139 this purpose.
140