]> sipb.mit.edu Git - ikiwiki.git/blob - doc/about_rcs_backends.mdwn
move to more appropriate page
[ikiwiki.git] / doc / about_rcs_backends.mdwn
1 # A few bits about the RCS backends
2
3 ## Terminology
4
5 ``web-edit'' means that a page is edited by using the web (CGI) interface
6 as opposed to using a editor and the RCS interface.
7
8
9 ## [[Subversion]]
10
11 Subversion was the first RCS to be supported by ikiwiki.
12
13 ### How does it work internally?
14
15 Master repository M.
16
17 RCS commits from the outside are installed into M.
18
19 There is a working copy of M (a checkout of M): W.
20
21 HTML is generated from W.  rcs_update() will update from M to W.
22
23 CGI operates on W.  rcs_commit() will commit from W to M.
24
25 For all the gory details of how ikiwiki handles this behind the scenes,
26 see [[commit-internals]].
27
28 You browse and web-edit the wiki on W.
29
30
31 ## [darcs](http://darcs.net/) (not yet included)
32
33 Support for using darcs as a backend is being worked on by [Thomas
34 Schwinge](mailto:tschwinge@gnu.org).
35
36 ### How will it work internally?
37
38 ``Master'' repository R1.
39
40 RCS commits from the outside are installed into R1.
41
42 HTML is generated from R1.  HTML is automatically generated (by using a
43 ``post-hook'') each time a new change is installed into R1.  It follows
44 that rcs_update() is not needed.
45
46 There is a working copy of R1: R2.
47
48 CGI operates on R2.  rcs_commit() will push from R2 to R1.
49
50 You browse the wiki on R1 and web-edit it on R2.  This means for example
51 that R2 needs to be updated from R1 if you are going to web-edit a page,
52 as the user otherwise might be irritated otherwise...
53
54 How do changes get from R1 to R2?  Currently only internally in
55 rcs\_commit().  Is rcs\_prepedit() suitable?
56
57 It follows that the HTML rendering and the CGI handling can be completely
58 separated parts in ikiwiki.
59
60 What repository should [[RecentChanges]] and [[History]] work on?  R1?
61
62 #### Rationale for doing it differently than in the Subversion case
63
64 darcs is a distributed RCS, which means that every checkout of a
65 repository is equal to the repository it was checked-out from.  There is
66 no forced hierarchy.
67
68 R1 is nevertheless called the master repository.  It's used for
69 collecting all the changes and publishing them: on the one hand via the
70 rendered HTML and on the other via the standard darcs RCS interface.
71
72 R2, the repository the CGI operates on, is just a checkout of R1 and
73 doesn't really differ from the other checkouts that people will branch
74 off from R1.
75
76 (To be continued.)
77
78
79 ## [[Git]]
80
81 Regarding the Git support, Recai says:
82
83 I have been testing it for the past few days and it seems satisfactory.  I
84 haven't observed any race condition regarding the concurrent blog commits
85 and it handles merge conflicts gracefully as far as I can see.
86
87 As you may notice from the patch size, GIT support is not so trivial to
88 implement (for me, at least).  Being a fairly fresh code base it has some
89 bugs.  It also has some drawbacks (especially wrt merge which was the hard
90 part).  GIT doesn't have a similar functionality like 'svn merge -rOLD:NEW
91 FILE' (please see the relevant comment in mergepast for more details), so I
92 had to invent an ugly hack just for the purpose.