(no commit message)
authorhttp://lovesgoodfood.com/jason/ <Jason_Riedy@web>
Sun, 26 Sep 2010 04:18:15 +0000 (04:18 +0000)
committerJoey Hess <joey@kitenet.net>
Sun, 26 Sep 2010 04:18:15 +0000 (04:18 +0000)
doc/news/openid/discussion.mdwn

index c0447a13fdbc84e8d8896581cacd64560c55055f..fdd5eecd18e265a955d19eed0fa5b150b6625f0b 100644 (file)
@@ -90,3 +90,5 @@ I just tried logging it with OpenID and it Just Worked.  Pretty painless.  If yo
 
 ###LiveJournal openid
 One caveat to the above is that, of course, OpenID is a distributed trust system which means you do have to think about the trust aspect.  A case in point is livejournal.com whose OpenID implementation is badly broken in one important respect:  If a LiveJournal user deletes his or her journal, and a different user registers a journal with the same name (this is actually quite a common occurrence on LiveJournal), they in effect inherit the previous journal owner's identity.  LiveJournal does not even have a mechanism in place for a remote site even to detect that a journal has changed hands.  It is an extremely dodgy situation which they seem to have *no* intention of fixing, and the bottom line is that the "identity" represented by a *username*.livejournal.com token should not be trusted as to its long-term uniqueness.  Just FYI.  --[[blipvert]]
 
 ###LiveJournal openid
 One caveat to the above is that, of course, OpenID is a distributed trust system which means you do have to think about the trust aspect.  A case in point is livejournal.com whose OpenID implementation is badly broken in one important respect:  If a LiveJournal user deletes his or her journal, and a different user registers a journal with the same name (this is actually quite a common occurrence on LiveJournal), they in effect inherit the previous journal owner's identity.  LiveJournal does not even have a mechanism in place for a remote site even to detect that a journal has changed hands.  It is an extremely dodgy situation which they seem to have *no* intention of fixing, and the bottom line is that the "identity" represented by a *username*.livejournal.com token should not be trusted as to its long-term uniqueness.  Just FYI.  --[[blipvert]]
+----
+Submitting bugs in the OpenID components will be difficult if OpenID must be working first...