more slang because looking them up is too hard
[wiki.git] / doc / zephyr.mdwn
1 [[!meta title="Using Zephyr (a.k.a. Zephyr For Dummies)"]]
2
3 <!-- For information on the archaic way of using Zephyr, see TraditionalZephyr.-->
4
5 ## Introduction to Zephyr
6
7 Zephyr is a general purpose chat system for MIT.
8
9 People use it to exchange information about classes, how their days are
10 going, and talk on Zephyr classes and instances about everything
11 from the latest episode of Game of Thrones to the next 18.03
12 problem set.
13
14 Zephyr is an underlying chat system; the built-in tools for exchanging messages via Zephyr are rudimentary. Most people who use Zephyr today take advantage of integrated clients that make the system easy to use.
15
16 ## Major clients
17
18 Here are some of the primary clients used at MIT. There's also a listing of [other Zephyr clients](http://zephyr.1ts.org/wiki/ZephyrClients), but their use is generally not recommended.
19
20 ### BarnOwl
21
22 [BarnOwl](http://barnowl.mit.edu/) is a command-line Zephyr client that supports advanced filtering and customisation. It is probably the most commonly used client, but requires some effort to get started. To use BarnOwl effectively, you should connect to an [Athena dialup](http://web.mit.edu/dialup/www/ssh.html) and run BarnOwl along with a program to renew your Kerberos tickets. The Athena command `athrun sipb pag-screen` will set up ticket renewal, and `athrun barnowl` after that will run BarnOwl itself.
23
24 In addition to primarily supporting Zephyr, BarnOwl also lets you connect to [AIM](http://aim.com), [XMPP/Jabber](http://xmpp.org/) (Google Talk, Facebook, etc.), [Twitter](http://twitter.com), and IRC networks.
25
26 See [Getting Started with BarnOwl](http://barnowl.mit.edu/wiki/GettingStarted) for more information.
27
28 ### Roost
29
30 [Roost](https://roost.mit.edu/) is a graphical Zephyr client built by [David Benjamin](https://davidben.net/) (MIT '12, SIPB member) as part of his [master's thesis](https://davidben.net/thesis.pdf). It is relatively new and currently considered experimental by its author.
31
32 Roost makes use of [Webathena](https://webathena.mit.edu/) to keep you subscribed to Zephyr. This makes for a much easier setup.
33
34 ### Zulip
35
36
37 [Zulip](https://zulip.com/zephyr) is a web-based Zephyr client that also provides [mobile apps](https://zephyr.zulip.com/apps) for Android and iOS and desktop apps for Linux, Mac, and Windows. Zulip is developed by a company composed largely of MIT alums and SIPB members.
38 Zulip, like Roost, is easy to set up because it uses Webathena for authentication.
39
40 See [Zulip for MIT setup](http://zulip.com/zephyr) for details.
41
42 <!-- merge to http://zephyr.1ts.org/wiki/ZephyrClients (I would do this, except I can't log in…)
43
44 ## Other Clients
45
46 There are other clients besides the above, but their use is not
47 nearly as widespread.  Some of these include:
48
49 * Owl (unmaintained, BarnOwl evolved from this)
50 * vt / jervt
51 * zwgc (see TraditionalZephyr)
52 * Pidgin
53 * zephyr-mode for emacs
54 * [ZephyrPlus web client](https://zephyrplus.mit.edu)
55
56 -->
57
58 ## Culture
59
60 ### Classes and Instances
61
62 Generally the most interesting discussion on Zephyr happens
63 on so-called Zephyr <em>classes</em>. A class is a bit like a chat
64 room in other IM systems. Anyone can send a zephyr to a class, and
65 anyone who is subscribed to that class will receive it. There is no
66 security on classes -- anyone who knows the name of a class can
67 subscribe, and there is no way to determine who is subscribed to a
68 given class.
69
70 To subscribe to a class, use the subscribe command:
71
72     :subscribe CLASSNAME * * 
73
74 To send a zephyr to a class, use the zwrite command with the -c option:
75
76     :zwrite -c CLASSNAME
77
78 Zephyrs to classes usually have an instance attached. An instance is a
79 short &ldquo;topic&rdquo; or &ldquo;subject&rdquo; that indicates the
80 context of a zephyr.  Different instances are often used to multiplex
81 multiple conversations on a high-traffic class. You can specify an
82 instance with the -i option to zwrite:
83
84     :zwrite -c CLASSNAME -i INSTANCE
85
86 A message without an instance specified will default to the instance
87 &ldquo;personal&rdquo;.
88
89 You can send zephyrs to individuals (as opposed to classes) with:
90
91     :zwrite USERNAME
92
93 ### Aside: zephyr triplets
94
95 All messages are actually sent to a "zephyr triplet" -- a class, instance, and recipient. Subscriptions are also made to zephyr triplets. The recipient can be either "*" -- to indicate a broadcast message -- or a specific individual.
96
97 When sending, the default class is "message", instance is "personal", and recipient is "*". `zwrite` supports sending to arbitrary triples with `:zwrite -c CLASS -i INSTANCE USERNAME` -- the two examples above use the defaults for the parts that aren't specified.
98
99 For subscriptions, the class must be specified. You can specify all instances on a class with "\*", or specify just one instance. You can only sub to recipient "\*" or your own personals (indicated by "%me%").)
100
101 ### Common classes
102
103 Some common classes include:
104
105 <strong>help</strong>:
106 > -c help is a class for asking (and answering) questions on virtually
107 > any topic imaginable. Be sure to use an instance (such as
108 > &ldquo;linux&rdquo;, &ldquo;barnowl&rdquo;, &ldquo;campus&rdquo;, or
109 > so on) when asking questions, since it's a fairly high-traffic
110 > class.
111
112 <strong>sipb</strong>:
113 > -c sipb is where most SIPB members hang out. It's a place for
114 > technical discussion, questions, support, and organizing SIPB events
115 > or projects. You should also always use an instance when sending to
116 > -c sipb.
117
118 <strong>Personal Classes</strong>:
119 > By convention, nearly every Zephyr user has a "personal" class that
120 > is the same as their username. How this class is used varies from
121 > person to person, but it's often a sort of mini-blog, a place to
122 > report what one is working on or up to, or ask friends questions, or
123 > just rant about something.
124
125 ### Zephyr Slang
126
127 If you spend enough time on Zephyr, you'll begin noticing some strange
128 phrases and words being thrown around.  Some of these include:
129
130 <strong>i,i foo</strong>:
131 > picked up from CMU zephyrland and means "I have no point here, I
132 > just like saying:".  Sometimes people simply use quotes: `"foo"`.
133
134 <strong>mix</strong>:
135 > If somebody accidentally sends a Zephyr to the wrong class or
136 > person, they will send another Zephyr to that wrong/class person
137 > simply saying "mix".  This basically just means, "oops, sorry, I
138 > didn't mean to send that Zephyr here".  You might also see "-i mix",
139 > which is the same thing, only with instances.
140
141 <strong>.d</strong>:
142 > You may see an instance change from `-i foo` to `-i foo.d`.  This
143 > indicates a deviation or tangent from the the original topic.
144
145 <strong>.q</strong>:
146 > Simiarly, `.q` at the end of an instance name indicates a quote.
147
148 <strong>starking</strong>:
149 > Answering a question or replying to a topic to a topic several hours
150 > (or days, occasionally) later. The term originates from Greg Stark,
151 > who would often reply to zephyrs hours or occasionally days later
152 > without seeing if anyone had answered yet, or worse, if the instance
153 > had moved on to an entirely different topic.
154
155 <strong>ttants</strong>:
156 > Literally, "Things That Are Not The Same".
157
158 <strong>prnf</strong>:
159 > Literally, "Pseudo-Random Neuron Firings".
160
161 <strong>eiz</strong> or <strong>eip</strong> or <strong>else</strong>:
162 > Instances used to comment on discussions on other classes in Zephyr without
163 > linking to the original source for reasons of privacy or discretion. "eiz"
164 > means "Elsewhere in Zephyr", "eip" means "Elsewhere in Personals".
165
166 <strong>eim</strong>:
167 > "Elsewhere in Meatspace"; instance used to comment on events not on Zephyr.
168
169 There are many other acronyms that are used; if you don't know what it means,
170 try using the `whats foo` command at an Athena terminal. If you don't have the
171 command, run `add sipb` first. Alternatively, running the single command
172 `athrun sipb whats foo` works as well.
173
174 ### Zephyr Etiquette
175
176 There are rules that people tend to use on Zephyr.  These include:
177
178 Good grammar, spelling, and punctuation.  Not everybody uses
179 capitalization, but they will still use good English.  Please do not say
180 things such as "hey wut r u up to???".  It makes you look like an idiot.
181 Really.
182
183 You don't need multiple question marks or exclamation points.  Usually.
184
185 There are a few abbreviations people use, such as YMMV (Your Mileage May
186 Vary) or IIRC (If I Remember Correctly), as well as some nerdier ones
187 like DTRT (Do The Right Thing, in reference to
188 [ The Rise of "Worse Is
189 Better"](http://www.jwz.org/doc/worse-is-better.html)).  Try running `add sipb; whats dtrt` to look up an
190 abbreviation.  Common abbreviations that you might find on AIM, however,
191 are not often used.  People tend to look down upon "lol", "rofl", and
192 such.
193
194 Personal classes are by convention considered a little more private than
195 non-personal (public) classes. Although most people don't mind people
196 they've met subscribing to their personal class and lurking, it's poor
197 form to talk loudly on the personal class of someone you don't know.
198
199
200 ## Interaction with Traditional Zephyr
201
202 The default Athena startup scripts launch `zwgc`  on login. `zwgc` displays a popup for each message, so if you are subscribed to many classes and use Zephyr as many do today, `zwgc`'s behavior is not very desirable. To disable `zwgc` startup, add:
203
204     setenv ZEPHYR_CLIENT false
205
206 to your `~/.environment` file if you use `tcsh` or
207
208     ZEPHYR_CLIENT=false
209
210 to your `~/.bash_environment` if you use `bash`. This will cause your
211 shell to launch the `false` executable instead of `zwgc`, thereby disabling it ('false' does nothing).