Add zlog viewer
[wiki.git] / projects / ideas.mdwn
1 [[!meta title="Project Ideas"]]
2
3 A lot of what SIPB does which is not helping users with immediate
4 problems and answering questions falls under the heading of SIPB
5 projects. SIPB projects are usually things that a member or two have
6 decided are worth doing and are working on. The main qualification of
7 SIPB projects is that they help the MIT community or the world at large
8 in some way. In general they also involve computers.
9
10 Here's a list of SIPB project ideas that have been mentioned recently,
11 along with the person who's suggested the project or a team that would
12 be good to contact. Feel free to get in touch if something sounds
13 interesting or you want advice getting started.
14
15 A [[list from 2008-2009|/doc/project-ideas]] may also have some relevant ideas.
16
17 [[!toc]]
18
19 ## "add me to this list" button
20
21 If I'm a webmaster for some group with an announcement list, it would be
22 really nifty if I could add some HTML code to my page to create a button
23 that, if someone clicks it, would use MIT certificates to find their
24 username and automatically add them to a list. This isn't particularly
25 difficult; you'll need to get a keytab (essentially, an account in
26 Kerberos / Moira) for the website, and write a script to set that keytab
27 as the list's "membership ACL" and a webapp to use that capability to
28 add or remove people from the list.
29
30 _Contact: geofft_
31
32 ## debdiffs of Debathena packages
33
34 We have [a webpage](http://debathena.mit.edu/package-list/proposed) to
35 list all Debathena packages in the ["proposed"
36 repository](http://debathena.mit.edu/experimental#proposed), i.e., things
37 we just changed and are waiting a few days for testing before pushing to
38 the clusters, etc. However, that page gives you no information on what
39 the change was. A very useful addition would be to use the `debdiff`
40 tool to link to the changelog and code changes for each new package.
41
42 _Contact: broder, debathena_
43
44 ## Better Trac-email integration
45
46 A bunch of SIPB projects use [Trac](http://trac.edgewall.org/) as a bug
47 tracker. The current email adapter we use [isn't very
48 clever](http://debathena.mit.edu/trac/ticket/308); it'll send
49 out each update to a ticket with a generic subject line, so it doesn't
50 easily indicate whether the bug was resolved or someone just commented
51 on it. It also doesn't know how to receive e-mail, so we can't reply to
52 the e-mails it generates and have our comments go back into the bug
53 tracker, and we can't [make bugs@mit.edu create Trac
54 tickets](http://debathena.mit.edu/trac/ticket/216). There are one or two
55 alleged plugins to do this, but they create a new ticket on every
56 e-mail, rather than doing something intelligent with replies; a better
57 plugin in both directions would be extremely helpful.
58
59 _Contact: debathena, geofft, broder_
60
61 ## PulseAudio support for the office sound system
62
63 There's a server in the SIPB office that you can "print" MP3 files to,
64 and they will get played one by one. A significantly more modern
65 interface to this would be to make a
66 [PulseAudio](http://www.pulseaudio.org/wiki/AboutPulseAudio) server out of the
67 computer hooked up to our sound system; this lets computers running
68 PulseAudio (notably, most recent desktop Linux distributions, but
69 Windows computers that install Pulse as well) route their sound to the
70 office speakers.
71
72 _Contact: geofft_
73
74 ## Cluster and printer viewer for the iPhone
75
76 You might have seen the xcluster displays (in the SIPB office, near the
77 four building 11 quickstations, and in the building 12 cluster) that
78 show you which clusters aren't in use and which printers aren't hosed.
79 This would be immensely more useful as an iPhone application.
80
81 _Contact: ccpost_
82
83 ## Snapshotted virtual machines for all popular Linux distributions
84
85 A common need for people writing Linux software is to check that their
86 software works on many popular distributions (Red Hat, SuSE, Debian,
87 Ubuntu, Xandros, etc. etc.), and on multiple versions of these
88 distributions. The qemu system emulator, and its virtualization cousin
89 kvm, support image snapshots and a fairly lightweight process for
90 running virtual machines, so you could set up an Athena locker with a
91 few commands that give you a temporary copy of a Linux system for a
92 particular distro and version that runs inside your terminal.
93
94 _Contact: geofft_
95
96 ## Efficient disk snapshot support
97
98 The previous project and a lot of other work could be made significantly
99 more efficient by rethinking the design decisions in qemu's snapshot
100 support. If this is the kind of thing that interests you...
101
102 _Contact: nelhage_
103
104 ## SIPB PostgreSQL server
105
106 A lot of people prefer Postgres to MySQL, so having a community Postgres
107 server akin to [sql.mit.edu](http://sql.mit.edu/), with similar access
108 control, could be a useful project. You could set it up on
109 [XVM](http://xvm.mit.edu/) with an eye to redoing the configuration on a
110 scripts-hosted VM at some future point.
111
112 This could easily become a bigger project, integrated with scripts'
113 autoinstallers, etc., depending on ambition. Or it can just be a
114 standalone server for people who want access to a Postgres database, but
115 don't want to set up and maintain a server on their own.
116
117 _Contact: mitchb, geofft_
118
119 ## Rewriting "add", "attach", etc. for Debathena
120
121 Athena used to have a system _liblocker_ for managing the /mit
122 directories and attaching and detaching links to networked filesystems.
123 Debathena and Macathena come with an automounter for /mit, so links
124 automatically appear when you use them, and nobdy cares much about
125 detaching them, but we still use most of the complexity of liblocker
126 because we haven't gotten around to cleaning it up. There's a [design
127 proposal](http://debathena.mit.edu/trac/wiki/FixingLiblocker) on the
128 Debathena bug tracker listing what should be a better implementation.
129
130 _Contact: broder, debathena_
131
132 ## Checking scripts.mit.edu servers for consistency
133
134 Now that we have five or six web servers (I've lost count), it's
135 become entirely too easy to change something on one or some but not
136 all of the servers. We often test changes, like newer versions of
137 packages or tweaked configuration, in place on one of the servers, but
138 we'd like something to remind us if we don't copy these changes to all
139 the other servers. This involves checking packages (RPM, perl, etc.) as
140 well as config files in /etc and possibly other things like LDAP config.
141
142 I've also been told by multiple people that
143 [Puppet](http://reductivelabs.com/products/puppet) or some other
144 configuration mangement framework is the Right Answer here. We looked at
145 Puppet and a bunch of others last summer and concluded none fit our
146 workflow well, but we could re-evaluate that.
147
148 _Contact: geofft, scripts-team_
149
150 We'd like a cron job to automatically tell us if
151 there are RPM packages installed on some but not all of the servers,
152 or if there are changes in /etc, other than hostname and such, that we
153 haven't committed to the scripts Subversion repository.
154
155 ## SIPB Library
156
157 SIPB has a bunch of books in its library. It'd be nice if a list of
158 the library books also existed online in some sort of sane, searchable
159 database. One possible platform is the [Exhibit](http://simile-widgets.org/exhibit/) project (which originates from a collaboration between the Haystack group in CSAIL and the MIT Libraries). This would require mostly just making a spreadsheet of the information.
160
161 _Contact: pbaranay, fawkes_
162
163 ## Improve the Setup and UI for new users of Zephyr
164
165 Currently, it is a pain to get someone else set up using zephyr
166 within screen on Linerva with automatically-renewing tickets.
167 We should write scripts to set them up so that that all they
168 have to do is enter a command or click an icon, type their kerberos
169 password, and then know how to use Barnowl.
170
171 _Contact: afarrell_
172
173 ## MITeX
174
175 Not a fully formed thought, yet, but the basic idea is to have a web app that lets users create a document, and then it texs the document nicely for them, based on some template that they've selected, and gives them a PDF.  They should have the ability to edit the source or just use the WYSIWYG editor.
176
177 _Contact: jhamrick_
178
179 ## Build a web client providing full control to the user
180
181 Create a web browser extension (or possibly a stand-alone browser) that is "web-developer antagonistic".  It essentially takes full advantage of the
182 immense power of a web client, ignoring the wishes of the web developer and server while letting the user take full control.  Every JavaScript event (ideally variable, function, etc.), every rendering decision, every cookie setting, every HTTP request, if the user so desires, etc. is not only made visible but easily changeable.  When making a request, every aspect of the
183 transaction can be completely fiddled with.
184
185 There are several extensions that allow you to do stuff sort of like
186 this (Firebug, Web Developer Toolbar, Chrome's web developer tools).  But they're hard to use and really mostly just debuggers.  Our goal here is to build something that goes out of its way to give you complete control via a nice UI.
187
188 _Contact: leonidg_
189
190 ## Improve git with shared checkouts
191
192 Around SIPB we're kind of [big](http://sipb.mit.edu/iap/git/) [fans](http://web.mit.edu/cluedumps/slides/understanding-git-2008.pdf) [of](http://blog.nelhage.com/2010/01/on-git-and-usability/) [git](http://negativespace.mit.edu/2010/03/08/gitionary-the-graphical-game-of-git-guessing/). But there is an area that git comes up short. We have a lot of common directories where people really just want to edit files in place (instead of wanting to clone/checkout, edit, commit, push...), but git doesn't support that well. It would be cool if there was a way to work with non-bare repositories in shared directories.
193
194 One idea might be using FUSE to present a separate checkout to each person using the directory.
195
196 _Contact: broder_
197
198 ## Scripts Pony Improvements
199
200 [Scripts Pony](http://pony.scripts.mit.edu) is scripts.mit.edu's new hostname management system.  It was just released recently, and has lots of bite-sized improvements remaining to be implemented.  Particularly good ideas include adding the ability to show and edit hostname aliases, checking whether hostname paths exist and giving appropriate feedback, creating a zephyrbot to allow people to approve tickets easily, and adding the ability to check hostnames in Moira automatically.
201
202 See [the project TODO file](http://web.mit.edu/pony/TODO) for more ideas.
203
204 _Contact: xavid_
205
206 ## Bazki
207
208 [Bazki](http://bazki.mit.edu/) is a wiki written in Python designed around several principles: structured data with object-oriented inheritance; using a wiki language with powerful macros that can be compiled into either HTML or PDF (via LaTeX); and making the content editable offline using a VCS.  Bazki works enough to to be useful, but it has lots of room for improvement and probably would benefit from some major design changes.
209
210 _Contact: xavid_
211
212 ## A zephyr log viewer
213
214 Many SIPB-affiliated people use the [Zephyr](http://zephyr.1ts.org/) messaging system, and the [Barnowl](http://barnowl.mit.edu/) client for it in particular. Barnowl has a number of very nice features that make it easy to follow large amounts of zephyr traffic: search, color coding, auto-narrowing, etc. Barnowl can also store logs of zephyrs sent and received for future reference, but the logs are saved separated by class in a way that's quite annoying to navigate sometimes. A Barnowl-like interface (perhaps implemented as a Barnowl plugin) for viewing zephyr logs would be a great thing to have.
215
216 _Contact: oremanj_
217
218 ## Your Project Here
219
220 SIPB can help you out in terms of both computing resources and
221 experienced people to bounce ideas off of. If you've got an idea for
222 something cool to advance the state of computing at MIT or just
223 computing in general, [[drop by our office|office]] and say hello.