add MIT vs. BSD reason
[wiki.git] / projects / collaboration.mdwn
index 3f9f61d48e8af94330b5a584d9c4723f4be57a80..1f3ad8f2f2f7e541229c050a0dd90d769c58fea6 100644 (file)
@@ -27,6 +27,8 @@ Since projects tend to vary as to GPLv2, GPLv2+ ("version 2 or, at your option,
 
 There are other licenses, most notably including the <a>BSD license</a>, which is similar to the MIT license, and the <a>AGPLv3</a>, which provides slightly more restrictions on reusers so that hosting a web application effectively counts as distribution. Code available under the GPLv3 can be used in an AGPLv3 application, but code only available under the AGPL cannot be used in a GPL application. Again, we recommend the GPL for compatibility.
 
+For a permissive license, MIT and BSD are basically equivalent ([MIT TLO](http://tlo.mit.edu/community/software) recommends BSD online, but in person indicates that they don't differentiate). We recommend MIT over BSD just because much of Athena already uses it, [MIT appears substantially more popular](https://github.com/blog/1964-license-usage-on-github-com), and [Github recommends it](https://choosealicense.com/).
+
 We anticipate that most SIPB projects' needs are best served by selecting either the MIT license or the GPL and moving on. However, if you are interested in this subject, you can learn more at [GNU's licensing website](http://www.gnu.org/licenses/) and [the Open Source Initiative's](http://www.opensource.org/licenses/). You can also read more about free and open source
 software on GNU and OSI's websites; see also the [Debian Free
 Software Guidelines](http://www.debian.org/social_contract#guidelines) and an [FAQ for it](http://people.debian.org/~bap/dfsg-faq.html).