Convert most http: links to https:
[wiki.git] / doc / zephyr.mdwn
index eea177cf79521a02ec5dc17f01d17b166d70c253..82fe3f93085bcda0f29ddabc4350faf7afcb2a89 100644 (file)
@@ -13,17 +13,19 @@ problem set.
 
 Zephyr is an underlying chat system; the built-in tools for exchanging messages via Zephyr are rudimentary. Most people who use Zephyr today take advantage of integrated clients that make the system easy to use.
 
+Here are [[detailed instructions for getting onto Zephyr.|doc/zephyr-quick]]
+
 ## Major clients
 
 Here are some of the primary clients used at MIT. There's also a listing of [other Zephyr clients](http://zephyr.1ts.org/wiki/ZephyrClients), but their use is generally not recommended.
 
 ### BarnOwl
 
-[BarnOwl](http://barnowl.mit.edu/) is a command-line Zephyr client that supports advanced filtering and customisation. It is probably the most commonly used client, but requires some effort to get started. To use BarnOwl effectively, you should connect to an [Athena dialup](http://web.mit.edu/dialup/www/ssh.html) and run BarnOwl along with a program to renew your Kerberos tickets. The Athena command `athrun sipb pag-screen` will set up ticket renewal, and `athrun barnowl` after that will run BarnOwl itself.
+[BarnOwl](https://barnowl.mit.edu/) is a command-line Zephyr client that supports advanced filtering and customisation. It is probably the most commonly used client, but requires some effort to get started. To use BarnOwl effectively, you should connect to an [Athena dialup](https://web.mit.edu/dialup/www/ssh.html) and run BarnOwl along with a program to renew your Kerberos tickets. The Athena command `athrun sipb pag-screen` will set up ticket renewal, and `athrun barnowl` after that will run BarnOwl itself.
 
-In addition to primarily supporting Zephyr, BarnOwl also lets you connect to [AIM](http://aim.com), [XMPP/Jabber](http://xmpp.org/) (Google Talk, Facebook, etc.), [Twitter](http://twitter.com), and IRC networks.
+In addition to primarily supporting Zephyr, BarnOwl also lets you connect to [AIM](https://aim.com), [XMPP/Jabber](https://xmpp.org/) (Google Talk, Facebook, etc.), [Twitter](https://twitter.com), and IRC networks.
 
-See [Getting Started with BarnOwl](http://barnowl.mit.edu/wiki/GettingStarted) for more information.
+See [Getting Started with BarnOwl](https://barnowl.mit.edu/wiki/GettingStarted) for more information.
 
 ### Roost
 
@@ -34,10 +36,11 @@ Roost makes use of [Webathena](https://webathena.mit.edu/) to keep you subscribe
 ### Zulip
 
 
-[Zulip](https://zulip.com/zephyr) is a web-based Zephyr client that also provides [mobile apps](https://zephyr.zulip.com/apps) for Android and iOS and desktop apps for Linux, Mac, and Windows. Zulip is developed by a company composed largely of MIT alums and SIPB members.
+[Zulip](https://zulipchat.com/zephyr) ([source code](https://github.com/zulip/zulip)) is a web-based Zephyr client that also provides [mobile apps](https://zephyr.zulipchat.com/apps) for Android and iOS and desktop apps for Linux, Mac, and Windows. Zulip was originally a proprietary product developed by a company composed largely of MIT alums and SIPB members. It was acquired by [Dropbox](https://www.dropbox.com/about) in 2014, and [released as open-source software](https://blogs.dropbox.com/tech/2015/09/open-sourcing-zulip-a-dropbox-hack-week-project/) a year later. The Zulip for Zephyr service is offered by [Tim Abbott](https://web.mit.edu/tabbott/www/) (MIT '06, SIPB member)'s Kandra Labs.
+
 Zulip, like Roost, is easy to set up because it uses Webathena for authentication.
 
-See [Zulip for MIT setup](http://zulip.com/zephyr) for details.
+See [Zulip for MIT setup](https://zulipchat.com/zephyr) for details.
 
 <!-- merge to http://zephyr.1ts.org/wiki/ZephyrClients (I would do this, except I can't log in…)
 
@@ -93,11 +96,11 @@ You can send zephyrs to individuals (as opposed to classes) with:
 It is possible to `zwrite` to multiple individuals at once, by listing the
 usernames separated by spaces:
 
-    :zwrite USERONE USERTWO USERTHREE
+    :zwrite -C USERONE USERTWO USERTHREE
 
-When doing this, it is customary to include the line `CC: USERONE USERTWO
-USERTHREE` in the body of the zephyr, although this is not required or
-enforced.
+The `-C` option automatically puts the line `CC: USERONE USERTWO USERTHREE`
+in the body of the zephyr,
+although this is only a convention and is not required or enforced.
 
 ### Aside: zephyr triplets
 
@@ -131,6 +134,14 @@ Some common classes include:
 > report what one is working on or up to, or ask friends questions, or
 > just rant about something.
 
+<strong>hello</strong>:
+> -c hello is for introducing yourself to the Zephyrsphere!
+> Send a zephyr to `-c hello -i YOUR_USERNAME` to let people
+> know you're a Zephyr user! This is a way to find out who else you know
+> uses Zephyr so you can subscribe to their class, and to get to know
+> new people through Zephyr. Also, feel free to invite others to
+> subscribe to your class!
+
 <strong>unclasses</strong>:
 > Most classes have an unclass, formed by prefixing "un" to the name. For
 > example, -c help has the unclass -c unhelp. The unclass is generally used for
@@ -179,7 +190,8 @@ phrases and words being thrown around.  Some of these include:
 > Similarly, `.q` at the end of an instance name indicates a quote.
 
 <strong>ttants</strong>:
-> Literally, "Things That Are Not The Same".
+> Literally, "Things That Are Not The Same". When the things are people,
+> <strong>pwants</strong> for "People Who Are Not The Same" may be used.
 
 <strong>prnf</strong>:
 > Literally, "Pseudo-Random Neuron Firing".
@@ -189,12 +201,16 @@ phrases and words being thrown around.  Some of these include:
 > linking to the original source for reasons of privacy or discretion. "eiz"
 > means "Elsewhere in Zephyr", "eip" means "Elsewhere in Personals".
 
+<strong>eiw</strong>:
+> "Elsewhere in Webspace": instance used to comment on events on the Internet beyond Zephyr (like, say, on another messaging service).
+
 <strong>eim</strong>:
 > "Elsewhere in Meatspace": instance used to comment on events not on Zephyr.
 
 <strong>doxp</strong>:
 > "Do X predicate", from Lisp naming convention. A discussion on whether one
 > should do X.
+> A common variation is "doxory", literally "Do X or Y".
 
 Many of the acronyms may be suffixed onto normal instance topics with a period
 to indicate relation. There are many other acronyms that are used; if you don't
@@ -208,8 +224,7 @@ There are rules that people tend to use on Zephyr.  These include:
 
 Good grammar, spelling, and punctuation.  Not everybody uses
 capitalization, but they will still use good English.  Please do not say
-things such as "hey wut r u up to???".  It makes you look like an idiot.
-Really.
+things such as "hey wut r u up to???".
 
 You don't need multiple question marks or exclamation points.  Usually.
 
@@ -217,10 +232,9 @@ There are a few abbreviations people use, such as YMMV (Your Mileage May
 Vary) or IIRC (If I Remember Correctly), as well as some nerdier ones
 like DTRT (Do The Right Thing, in reference to
 [ The Rise of "Worse Is
-Better"](http://www.jwz.org/doc/worse-is-better.html)).  Try running `add sipb; whats dtrt` to look up an
-abbreviation.  Common abbreviations that you might find on AIM, however,
-are not often used.  People tend to look down upon "lol", "rofl", and
-such.
+Better"](https://www.jwz.org/doc/worse-is-better.html)). 
+As mentioned above, try running `athrun sipb whats dtrt` to look up an
+abbreviation.
 
 Personal classes are by convention considered a little more private than
 non-personal (public) classes. Although most people don't mind people