uncommitted changes to doc/debian-hacking
authorGeoffrey Thomas <geofft@mit.edu>
Mon, 9 Feb 2009 04:17:31 +0000 (23:17 -0500)
committerGeoffrey Thomas <geofft@mit.edu>
Mon, 9 Feb 2009 04:17:31 +0000 (23:17 -0500)
Signed-off-by: Geoffrey Thomas <geofft@mit.edu>
doc/debian-hacking.mdwn

index 70c84d54c313ca7eb5c281cec836666b26403b7b..7196db3e25affae250cfa004e5e11056997c4364 100644 (file)
@@ -1,9 +1,9 @@
 Debian and Ubuntu packages make it easy to hack on software that's
 Debian and Ubuntu packages make it easy to hack on software that's
-packaged and try out your changes. These instructions assume that you
-have an understanding of how Debian packaging works, although all you
-really need to know is that each file in the distribution comes from a
-<i>package</i>, which contains the compiled form of a <i>source
-package</i>.
+packaged and try out your changes, within the framework of the packaging
+system. These instructions assume that you have an understanding of how
+Debian packaging works, although all you really need to know is that
+each file in the distribution comes from a <i>package</i>, which
+contains the compiled form of a <i>source package</i>.
 
 1. Figure out what package the software is from. Usually it's named
 approximately the same as the software itself, e.g., `barnowl` or `gdb`
 
 1. Figure out what package the software is from. Usually it's named
 approximately the same as the software itself, e.g., `barnowl` or `gdb`
@@ -18,11 +18,12 @@ download the source package.
 3. cd into the directory that was just created and make whatever changes
 you want.
 
 3. cd into the directory that was just created and make whatever changes
 you want.
 
-4. Run the command `dch -i`, which edits the debian/changelog file. Add
-something like "~edited1" to the end of the verson; a version with a
-tilde in it comes before a version without. This means Debian will let
-you install your edited version over the current version, but also
-permit the next offical release to supersede your hacked version.
+4. Run the command `dch -i`, which edits the debian/changelog file and
+increments the version. Add something like "~edited1" to the end of the
+version, because a version with a tilde in it is considered older than a
+version without. This means Debian will let you install your edited
+version over the current version, but also permit the next offical
+release to supersede your hacked version.
 
 5. Run the command `debuild` to compile the software and build a
 package.
 
 5. Run the command `debuild` to compile the software and build a
 package.