Fixed a remaining typo and replaced all h1's with h2's to side-step a
authorDonald Guy <fawkes@mit.edu>
Sun, 1 Feb 2009 09:39:59 +0000 (04:39 -0500)
committerDonald Guy <fawkes@mit.edu>
Sun, 1 Feb 2009 09:39:59 +0000 (04:39 -0500)
rendering "misfeature"

doc/afs-and-you.html

index 59e05a6b2c88c60963e958dc4fcd4c6143e1dc14..f470f8366c058d888d9795088b8afb724076469f 100644 (file)
@@ -39,7 +39,7 @@ Mostly written by Donald Guy, <br />
 drawn from a variety of sources. <br />
 Credit goes to them, blame goes to him.
 </p>
-<h1 id="WhatisAFS">What is AFS?</h1>
+<h2 id="WhatisAFS">What is AFS?</h2>
 <p>
 The <strong>Andrew File System</strong> or <strong>AFS</strong> is a distributed network file system invented at <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/index.shtml">Carnegie Mellon University</a> as part of Project Andrew (approximately their equivalent of MIT's Project Athena). More importantly, it is the file system used to store most files on Athena today. This includes your personal home directory, the data and websites of many living groups and student groups on campus, and probably some of the software you run (if you ever use Athena clusters). (Though all user directories were migrated from NFS in the summer of 1992, some files probably still remain on NFS and, of course, various file systems are used on personal computers and servers.)
 
@@ -50,7 +50,7 @@ The <strong>Andrew File System</strong> or <strong>AFS</strong> is a distributed
 <p>
 For the most part, using AFS, particularly at MIT, is well-hidden and can be used like any other UNIX file system. For some things, you will need to know a bit more. Let's start by defining some terms.
 </p>
-<h1 id="SomeMITAFSterminology">Some MIT/AFS terminology</h1>
+<h2 id="SomeMITAFSterminology">Some MIT/AFS terminology</h2>
 <dl><dt><strong>locker</strong></dt><dd>
 For practical purposes, a folder. Probably the what you'll care about most of the time. Technically any directory mountable under /mit, regardless of how its stored. Today, most lockers lockers are stored in AFS.
 </dd></dl>
@@ -59,9 +59,9 @@ Essentially proof to the AFS servers that you are who you say you are, thus allo
 
 </dd></dl>
 <dl><dt><strong>cell</strong></dt><dd>
-AFS concept of an "administrative domain of authority." Each cell has its own set of users, groups, and administrators. Analogous to a Kerberos realm. Each top-level directory in /afs corresponds to a cell. The cells you are most likely to care about are {{athena.mit.edu}} and {{sipb.mit.edu}}.
+AFS concept of an "administrative domain of authority." Each cell has its own set of users, groups, and administrators. Analogous to a Kerberos realm. Each top-level directory in /afs corresponds to a cell. The cells you are most likely to care about are <tt>athena.mit.edu</tt> and <tt>sipb.mit.edu</tt>.
 </dd></dl>
-<h1 id="TheBasics">The Basics</h1>
+<h2 id="TheBasics">The Basics</h2>
 <h2 id="TheLayoutofaTypicalMITLocker">The Layout of a Typical MIT Locker</h2>
 <p>
 Every Athena user has a locker (their home directory), which mounts at <tt>/mit/&lt;username&gt;</tt>. From a technical standpoint, it is stored in the volume <tt>user.&lt;username&gt;</tt> which is located at <tt>/afs/athena.mit.edu/user/&lt;first letter&gt;/&lt;second letter&gt;/&lt;user name&gt;</tt>. For example, the user <tt>joeuser</tt> has a home directory that mounts at <tt>/mit/joeuser</tt>, is volume <tt>user.joeuser</tt>, and is accessible at <tt>/afs/user/j/o/joeuser</tt>. Lockers for projects, software, classes, living groups, and student groups are all mounted at <tt>/mit/&lt;lockername&gt;</tt> and stored at various places in AFS.
@@ -112,7 +112,7 @@ activity.chess-club         1500000     13163    1%         90%
 If this information is good enough for you, then you are done. If not, read on.
 </p>
 
-<h1 id="CommonTasks">Common Tasks</h1>
+<h2 id="CommonTasks">Common Tasks</h2>
 <h2 id="ControllingWhocanAccessFiles">Controlling Who can Access Files</h2>
 <p>
 You may be familiar with Unix permissions. Sad to say, but that knowledge is basically useless here. Whereas Unix permissions, are per-file, AFS permissions are controlled by <strong>Access Control List</strong>s (<strong>ACL</strong>s) on a per-directory basis. 
@@ -220,7 +220,7 @@ There after the users should be able to get to the folders at <tt>http'''s'''://
 <p>
 see also: <a href="http://web.mit.edu/is/web/reference/web-resources/https.html">http://web.mit.edu/is/web/reference/web-resources/https.html</a>
 </p>
-<h1 id="Troubleshooting">Troubleshooting</h1>
+<h2 id="Troubleshooting">Troubleshooting</h2>
 <h3 id="ImtryingtoaccessmyfilesfslasaysIshouldhavepermissionsherebutitstillsays:Permissiondenied">I'm trying to access my files, <tt>fs la</tt> says I should have permissions here, but it still says <tt>: Permission denied</tt></h3>
 <p>
 There are two likely possibilities. First, its likely that your tokens may have expired. To get new tokens, make sure you have valid kerberos tickets and then run <tt>aklog</tt>. Another possibility is that you have tokens but not for the correct cell. <tt>tokens</tt> will tell you what tokens you already have. In all likelihood, if you are reading this, you probably want <tt>aklog athena sipb</tt>. Finally, a third possibility is that your group membership has changed since you acquired tokens. Try running <tt>aklog -force</tt>
@@ -252,7 +252,7 @@ Yeah, most AFS servers restart weekly at 6 AM on Sunday.
 <p>
 There may be a non-scheduled AFS outage. Check <a href="http://3down.mit.edu">3down</a>, hopefully it will be back up soon :-(.
 </p>
-<h1 id="AdvancedTasks">Advanced Tasks</h1>
+<h2 id="AdvancedTasks">Advanced Tasks</h2>
 <h2 id="PuttingSoftwareinaLocker">Putting Software in a Locker</h2>
 <p>
 The Athena environment was designed to allow software to run on several architectures on the same network. On modern Athena, this means 32-bit x86s running Linux, 64-bit x86s running Linux, and SPARCs running Solaris. To accommodate these these various architectures AFS (at least on Athena) has a notion of what systems are compatible with the operating system. You can find these by running <tt>fs sysname</tt>.
@@ -300,7 +300,7 @@ While it is easily possible to make an AFS group for yourself, it is harder to g
 </p>
 
    
-<h1 id="SeeAlso">See  Also</h1>   
+<h2 id="SeeAlso">See  Also</h2>   
 <p>SIPB's older guide, <a href="http://stuff.mit.edu/afs/sipb.mit.edu/project/doc/afs/html/afs-new.html">Inessential AFS</a>  <br /> OpenAFS documentation  at <a href="http://www.openafs.org/">http://www.openafs.org/</a>
 </p>