Correct root-instance paranoia
authorAlexander Chernyakhovsky <achernya@mit.edu>
Thu, 28 Feb 2013 22:28:06 +0000 (17:28 -0500)
committerAlexander Chernyakhovsky <achernya@mit.edu>
Thu, 28 Feb 2013 22:28:06 +0000 (17:28 -0500)
doc/root-instance.mdwn

index d3bc5eebf96ce6a98a83198d98d46780c63603ea..1d43b2368cb5d91538e50aad00681cc1662c7e11 100644 (file)
@@ -36,21 +36,19 @@ wisest idea to let servers that you're asking hundreds of people to
 log into and use be controlled by a password you're typing everywhere.
 
 So you get a root instance, and only type the root instance password
-on computers you trust and only when you need to. Many people only
-ever type it on their laptop, or on a freshly booted Live CD. Some
-people feel comfortable typing it on a few private Athena workstations
-(SIPB office heads are a common choice), but if an attacker has stolen
-your regular (null instance) password and installed a keylogger on
-your account, it doesn't matter where you're logging in if it's still
-your Athena account.
+on computers you trust and only when you need to.  You should only
+type your password on a computer that you trust, such a private laptop
+or workstation.  If you have access to physical hardware that you
+trust, but not a trusted installation, you can use a printed LiveCD,
+or a one-time LiveUSB as created by hardware that you trust.
 
 You can also make things in Moira or AFS owned by your root instance,
 if you don't want your null instance to be able to mess with mailing
 lists or lockers. For Moira, make them owned by
-`KERBEROS:yourname/root@ATHENA.MIT.EDU`. For AFS, ask accounts or afsreq to get
-you a 'pts id', basically an account with the AFS servers, and then
-you can give bits to yourname.root and start blanching your root
-instance onto AFS groups.
+`KERBEROS:yourname/root@ATHENA.MIT.EDU`. For AFS, ask accounts or
+afsreq to get you a 'pts id', basically an account with the AFS
+servers, and then you can give bits to yourname.root and start
+blanching your root instance onto AFS groups.
 
 To use another instance, just specify it to the kinit command, e.g.,
 `kinit joeuser/root`.